Employer Identification Number

Your Employer Identification Number (EIN) is your federal tax ID. You need it to pay federal taxes, hire employees, open a bank account, and apply for business licenses and permits.

It’s free to apply for an EIN, and you should do it right after you register your business.

Your business needs a federal tax ID number if it does any of the following:

  1. Pays employees

  2. Operates as a corporation of partnership

  3. Files tax returns for employment, excise, or alcohol, tobacco, and firearms

  4. Withholds taxes on income, other than wages, paid to a non-resident alien

  5. Uses a Keogh Plan (a tax-deferred pension plan)

  6. Works with certain types of organizations

Apply for an EIN with the IRS assistance tool. It will guide you through questions and ask for your name, social security number, address, and your “Doing Business As” (DBA) name. Your nine-digit federal tax ID becomes available immediately upon verification.

Change or replace your Employer Identification Number

If you already have an EIN, you might have to change or replace it with a new one if certain changes have occurred with your business.

Types of business changes that might require you to change or replace your EIN are:

Name change Address change Changes in ownership Changes in management Change in tax status

Your requirements will depend on your business structure and the kind of change that occurred. Check with the IRS to determine exactly whether you need to change or replace your EIN.

Do you need help apply for or changing your Employer Identification Number? Make an appointment with one our small business counselors.

Where to Find Us

Iowa Western Community College

2700 College Road

121 Ashley Hall (Park in Ashley Hall Visitor Parking)

Council Bluffs, Iowa 51503

712-325-3350

Sue Pitts - spitts@iwcc.edu

Michael Mitilier - mmitilier@iwcc.edu

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Funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S Small Business Administration (SBA). All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA